Family Based Immigration

There are few things more rewarding for an immigration lawyer than helping unite or create a new family. At Margaret W. Wong & Associates, our experienced lawyers and staff will carefully answer your questions and help you through your USA family immigration matters.

Types of USA Family Immigration

K-1 fiancé visas allow you to stay in the United States for 90 days to marry your fiancé and apply for Permanent Residency.  K-2 visas are available for children of people who get K1 visas.

A K-3 visa holder has concluded a valid marriage with a citizen of the United States; has a relative petition (Form I-130) filed by the U.S. citizen spouse for the person; seeks to enter the United States to await the approval of the petition and subsequent lawful permanent resident status, and, has an approved Form I-129F. A K-4 visa holder, is a person under 21 years of age and is the unmarried child of an alien eligible to be a K-3.

Many other types of visas are reserved for spouses and children of people who enter the United States on special visas. For example, F-2 visas are for the spouses and children of students in academic or language training programs. The students themselves enter on F-1 visas.

Similarly, J-2 visas are reserved for spouses and children of exchange visitors, who come in on J-1 visas. L-2 visas are given to the immediate family members of L-1 visa holders, who are people transferred to the United States branch of an international company. An E-2 visa holder may bring his or her spouse and minor unmarried children to the U.S. as dependents in the E-2 category as well. Similarly, for those principal holder's of H-1B visas, an immediate family member may accompany that H-1B holder under the H-4 visa. 

Marriage to a US Citizen

It is well-known that marrying a U.S. citizen can get you a green card, but it is often a complex and challenging process. For example, we had one client who made mistakes on her fiancé petition that seemed to doom her application. But our attorneys helped her file a waiver of excludability based on her troubled marriage, and got a successful ending.

Once married, whether you married in the U.S. or abroad, you will need to undergo a marriage interview with a representative of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The job of the interviewer is to determine if your marriage is "real" or if it is simply a marriage of convenience.